www.Brooklyn-Homebrew.com
www.Brooklyn-Homebrew.com

A homebrew discussion board for Brooklyn and beyond!


You are not connected. Please login or register

When Going to Fermenter

View previous topic View next topic Go down  Message [Page 1 of 1]

1 When Going to Fermenter on Wed Jun 23, 2010 5:15 pm

Newb question to start things off here. When going from brewing to fermenter should you strain the wort? Does it depend on the beer? I'm in the middle of fermenting an IPA and I didn't strain going to carboy...I hope it will be okay.

View user profile

2 what all is floating in there? on Wed Jun 23, 2010 5:24 pm

It's definitely normal to strain or filter the wort on it's way to the fermenter.

A little more information would help for giving guidance. Do you have a lot of stuff in your fermenter now, like grains and hops? Is it just some dust clouding things up? Do you have a second fermenter you could transfer it into, by any chance?

View user profile

3 Re: When Going to Fermenter on Wed Jun 23, 2010 5:37 pm

Yeah, there was just so much stuff clogging the strainer, due to all the hops I guess that I decided to just go for it and not strain it. It's been fermenting for a week and is pretty much finishing up at this point. I do have a secondary fermenter.

View user profile

4 Re: When Going to Fermenter on Wed Jun 23, 2010 6:07 pm

I try to strain, but I have the same trouble (especially with pellet hops) with a clogged strainer. I find it helps a little to create a multi staged system... bare with me, this is an over-technical way of saying: put a wire cooking strainer over a funnel that has a finer mesh strainer installed. You'll have to empty out the gunk a few times as you go, but you get clogged up a bit less that way.

Don't worry too much about straining. Most of the big stuff will settle out in the fermenter. Just keep the end of the racking cane a couple inches off the bottom when you're pulling the finished beer out.

View user profile

5 Re: When Going to Fermenter on Wed Jun 23, 2010 6:10 pm

for your next brew you can use muslin or nylon bags to contain the grains and hops during the boil. that makes clean-up easier too.

or if you like to keep everything floating free during the boil, then give this a try... sanitize a colander and hold it above and inside of your funnel strainer. As you pour your wort through and into the fermenter the colander will catch the bigger pieces, leaving the funnel screen to catch the finer grist and/or hop pellet powder.

edit: Astoria's on it! so I second that.

View user profile

6 Re: When Going to Fermenter on Wed Jun 23, 2010 6:25 pm

ehn...it all settles out in the fermenter anyway. I stopped straining because frankly it's just too much of a pain in the ass. Mad easier to take precautions like hop bags and whirlpooling.

View user profile

7 Re: When Going to Fermenter on Wed Jun 23, 2010 6:31 pm

wendelgee2 wrote:ehn...it all settles out in the fermenter anyway. I stopped straining because frankly it's just too much of a pain in the ass. Mad easier to take precautions like hop bags and whirlpooling.
Yeah, that's was kind of my thinking. eff it. I read on another forum that putting a meslin bag around a siphoner does the trick really well to.

View user profile

8 Re: When Going to Fermenter on Wed Jun 23, 2010 6:46 pm

I usually go with bags for my hops, and a whirlpool + brief settling period to avoid most of the trub. Just be aware that hop bags will reduce your hop utilization somewhat, so you may need to use a bit more than otherwise if you do not have a lot of wort flowing through the hops.

View user profile

9 Re: When Going to Fermenter on Wed Jun 23, 2010 7:29 pm

Hop bags are a must, especially for IPA's. They will barely effect the hop usage while almost completely eliminating hop matter from your finished wort.

I never strain, waste of time. Plus, by dumping the wort violently into the fermentor, I achieve enough oxygenation to get the fermentation started with a few short hours.

Ditch the secondary (transferring the beer is adding a chance of infection) and just primary for 2 weeks, everything will settle out. Autolysis, the only reason to get beer off the of the yeast, won't set in for A LONG time; you will be totally safe within 2 weeks.

View user profile

10 Re: When Going to Fermenter on Wed Jun 23, 2010 7:34 pm

I dislike hop bags because I just don't like the idea of boiling a nylon bag for 60-90 minutes in my brew.
If you use whole hops, straining is much easier.

View user profile

11 Re: When Going to Fermenter on Wed Jun 23, 2010 7:40 pm

Airborneguy wrote:Hop bags are a must, especially for IPA's. They will barely effect the hop usage while almost completely eliminating hop matter from your finished wort.

I never strain, waste of time. Plus, by dumping the wort violently into the fermentor, I achieve enough oxygenation to get the fermentation started with a few short hours.

Ditch the secondary (transferring the beer is adding a chance of infection) and just primary for 2 weeks, everything will settle out. Autolysis, the only reason to get beer off the of the yeast, won't set in for A LONG time; you will be totally safe within 2 weeks.

Ditto Mister!

View user profile http://brooklyn-homebrew.com

12 Re: When Going to Fermenter on Wed Jun 23, 2010 7:41 pm

Cool

View user profile

13 Re: When Going to Fermenter on Wed Jun 23, 2010 7:50 pm

brooklynhomebrew wrote:
Airborneguy wrote:Hop bags are a must, especially for IPA's. They will barely effect the hop usage while almost completely eliminating hop matter from your finished wort.

I never strain, waste of time. Plus, by dumping the wort violently into the fermentor, I achieve enough oxygenation to get the fermentation started with a few short hours.

Ditch the secondary (transferring the beer is adding a chance of infection) and just primary for 2 weeks, everything will settle out. Autolysis, the only reason to get beer off the of the yeast, won't set in for A LONG time; you will be totally safe within 2 weeks.

Ditto Mister!

I must disagree with you two. If you're fermenting something that is high in OG, such as 1.70+, you'll have an inch of yeast alone in the bottom of the fermenter. If you also dump in a ton of hops along with coagulated proteins, you'll have 1.5-2 inches. If from there you go straight into the bottle, since kegging such high alcohol brew is just waaay too hardcore, at least for my tastes, you'll end up sucking in a TON of yeast and trub into the bottling bucket. Have I done that? Sure. Two ways to deal with it - cold crash + secondary, or cold crash and gelatin to clear and compact the sediment, and carefully rack off the supernatant.
To me, it is much easier to simply maintain sanitary equipment and practices rather than hold your siphon and watch it like a hawk while racking off, not to mention a chance of 2 inches of yeast in your bottle lol.
Though again, if you brew something around 1050, secondary is quite unnecessary, unless you're adding fruit or some such.

View user profile

14 Re: When Going to Fermenter on Wed Jun 23, 2010 7:55 pm

Airborneguy wrote:Hop bags are a must, especially for IPA's.

Definitely.
That reminds me, Danielle and Ben. I think there are finer mesh hop bags out there than the ones I bought at your place last time. I have one that will even hold hop pellet matter. Just something to look into, if you're still expanding your stock.

I love you

View user profile

15 Re: When Going to Fermenter on Wed Jun 23, 2010 8:04 pm

Dimik wrote: If you also dump in a ton of hops along with coagulated proteins, you'll have 1.5-2 inches. If from there you go straight into the bottle, since kegging such high alcohol brew is just waaay too hardcore, at least for my tastes, you'll end up sucking in a TON of yeast and trub into the bottling bucket.

That's why I mentioned Hop bags as being a must Wink

Secondly, from fermentor to bottling bucket is a different story than from boiling to fermenting as the question referred. Obviously care must be given towards finished beer being siphoned into the bottling bucket. No matter how you do it, you are going to have trub, and siphoning off of 1 inch of trub or 35 inches is exactly the same: you must keep the racking cane off of the trub.

View user profile

16 Re: When Going to Fermenter on Wed Jun 23, 2010 8:06 pm

I was just advocating straining the wort when going into fermenter because I hate the idea of boiling nylon in my beer. And whole hops are much easier to strain, or if you have a spigot in your kettle.

View user profile

17 Re: When Going to Fermenter on Wed Aug 25, 2010 3:45 pm

I don't use hop sacks anymore, and I have no secondary fermenter. Ever try Smuttynose IPA? ... there's more floaties in there than an asteroid shower, and they're proud of it. Some of my brews are pretty clear, no floaties, some are cloudy, some have floaties ... eh ... they're all great.
Throw pellet hops in the pot!

Most of the big stuff settles in the fermenter. Just pour beer slow from the bottle to the glass when it's time to enjoy, and if trub cloudiness bothers you, leave the last half ounce in the bottle. I like it, though, vitamin B!

What a Face

View user profile

18 Re: When Going to Fermenter on Sat Nov 26, 2011 1:18 am

Dimik wrote:I dislike hop bags because I just don't like the idea of boiling a nylon bag for 60-90 minutes in my brew.
If you use whole hops, straining is much easier.

you wouldn't be boiling it. dry hopping would be done in a secondary anyway, just a dunk in star san and it'd be good, i've done it.

View user profile

19 Re: When Going to Fermenter Today at 5:01 pm

Sponsored content


View previous topic View next topic Back to top  Message [Page 1 of 1]

Permissions in this forum:
You cannot reply to topics in this forum